(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A new portrait of Abraham Lincoln"

n ^ J h^ 



7r 



JUST 


PUBLISHED 


^HK^^ 


Bf^^l 




^H^^^H 






B"'— -- ' ^ .;.|W 


^^^Mm^^^^M 




^^^^^H 




Bj^^H 


^^^^H^^^^^ 


li^l^^^l 



A NEW PORTRAIT OF 
ABRAHAM LINCOLN 



ARTHUR H. HAHLO 5? CO. 

569 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



PORTRAIT OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DAVID ROSEN 
ISSUED IN THREE STATES, AS FOLLOWS 

FIRST STATE 

PROOF FROM THE COPPER PLATE 

[21 IMPRESSIONS only] $50 
SECOND STATE 

SIGNED REMARQUE PROOF $36 

THIRD STATE 

SIGNED ARTISTS PROOF $25 

NO OTHER STATE WILL BE ISSUED 
SIZE OF ETCHING I4X 17 



COMMENTS OF ART CRITICS 

A new portrait of Abraham Lincoln, as etched by David 
Rosen, late of Paris, is a summer art event. Mr. Rosen's 
portrait is a pleasing addition to the extant Lincoln por- 
traits. 

The great war President, who looms large when measured 
by any other occupant of the Presidential chair, is shown 
with his full face turned somewhat to the left. It is 
evident that the other Lincoln portraits with which we are 
familiar have been carefully studied, and out of these, as 
a composite, has grown the present Rosen conception of 
Lincoln. 

The portrait is a serious one, and the lines of care and 
responsibility show plainly upon the saddened face. There 
is no suggestion of the frivolous Lincoln — the story loving 
and rollicking one — but the Lincoln of the telegraph office, 
Lincoln the emancipator, Lincoln from whom we have the 
masterly Gettysburg address, looks out of the bitten plate 
with kindly eyes and adorned with a full beard. 

The concentration of light upon the face intensifies the 
background. The large ears, the ample nose, and the 
wrinkled and scarred face, with the rolling collar and black 
stock of the period, are admirably composed in exposition 
of the Lincoln of humanity. 

The entrance of the United States into the world war, 
and the many problems thus encountered, inevitably sug- 
gests the harking back to the Civil War and to the dominat- 
ing figure of Lincoln, which makes the advent of this 
particular portrait very timely, and endows it with much 
more than a commonplace interest. 

Mr. Rosen is to be congratulated upon his work as 
revealed in his Lincoln. — W. G. BOWDOIN, Evening World 



COMMENTS OF ART CRITICS 

Considering the intense and universal interest in Lincoln, 
the number of serious portrait studies of his face is not 
large. And those that give any satisfaction to one who 
cares both for Lincoln and for American art may be counted 
on the fingers. The celebration of the centenary in iQoq 
was doubtless responsible for some of the additions to the 
brief list. And the national quickening that has come 
during the last year is turning the creative mind again 
to this irresistible yet baffling subject. 

There has just been published a new Lincoln that must 
take rank with the true portraits. It is a life sized head 
etched by David Rosen. The face is slightly turned, but 
the aspect is nearer that of full face than profile. The 
full beard is shown. Evidently the artist has made a 
study of all the Lincoln portraits, though the photographs 
taken toward the end of the President's life give the chief 
character to the work. Naturally the structure of the 
skull is based on the life mask taken some years earlier, 
before there was a beard. 

Somebody noted the fact that the face was reversed, 
since it had been made on the copper plate as though that 
were to be reproduced. When this was called to Rosen's 
attention he answered with a smile: "This is Lincoln as 
he saw himself — the Lincoln of the Mirror." 

Dignity is one of the marked characteristics of this 
interpretation. But it is the dignity of character, not an 
assumption of formal importance. In some respects the 
etching resembles the portrait by Marshall, but it escapes 
the touch of blandness. Although it is not lacking in 
humanity, the emphasis is placed on the keen mind of the 
man who thought his way through the confusions and 
prejudices of his time, found the truth and led a nation to 
see it and to live together in its light. 

— Robert J. Cole, Evening Sun 



yLZOOlO^'f. 05^50